Digital Twin – Topical use cases

Being left behind in an increasingly digital world is a scary thought.  Gartner predicts that this year alone, organisations with digital trustworthiness will have a substantial advantage (of up to 20% increased revenue in online channels) compared to their competitors.  In our previous article, Digital Twins – Why all the fuss, we introduced the concept of digital twins and their benefits. This article describes five potential use cases of digital twin technologies, focused on providing real value to organisations and consumers.  Digital integrations, specifically with digital twin solutions, are predicted to be one of this decade’s biggest disruptors – let’s explore some practical use cases.

Improve utility service delivery by understanding, predicting and executing usage strategies in real time with a digital twin

Electricity is the most fundamental of utilities.  Even though it’s such a new concept in the context of human history (I know – this sounds strange – but the earliest evidence of human’s harnessing electricity in the early common era, only about 5% of our existence as a species)!  Despite its relative brevity, we have a fundamental reliance on power!  Utility management is very important, particularly in South Australia, where we have a reliance on other states for our energy.  So, how can service providers achieve better outcomes using a digital twin?  Using our new-found definition, let’s explore this in the context of a digital model of a space – an electrical substation.

What type of data is available?

Without providing contextual value, all a digital twin is, is a digital model, so we need to understand the type of data available to our use case to understand potential value.  A substation contains sensors which measure electrical throughput.  Subject Matter Experts (SME’s) also understand the thresholds associated with throughput, pertaining to specific assets within the substation.  All this information, along with historical supply and usage information, should be modelled and organised in a manner to provide contextual insight.  Further to this, AI predictive models, trained on available historical data, can be integrated to provide recommended actions, warnings and decision support.

What’s the benefit?

Imagine you’re a service technician, responsible for maintaining service delivery to a region within South Australia.  Using your industry-customised digital twin such as the exposé Digital Twin, you can explore the substation digitally, in a fraction of the time, compared to actual exploration.  (Imagine not needing to travel to the site when remote working)!  Your digital twin ensures you’re provided with context sensitive information immediately and in real-time. 

As you are traversing the digital space, you notice that the electrical throughput on one of the transformers is slightly elevated (via visual and auditory cues).  Upon clicking on the resource, a map of available resistors denotes that a resistor has malfunctioned and is offline; the digital twin recommends that a service ticket is generated to resolve the issue.  You accept the recommendation, and the ticket is created.  Later that afternoon, the resistor is replaced, and no service loss is experienced. To extend this, composite digital twins allow you to understand and visualise the entire, or local network, rather than only providing contextual information for one distribution centre or substation.

Pathfinding in 2020: understand University library movements with digital twin technologies

Have you ever found yourself wandering the aisles of a library, supermarket, or department store aimlessly looking in “the obvious places” for something, only to find it twenty minutes later, in a location you never thought to look?  If you answered no, you’re either a liar, or a genius!  Improving customer experience is core to any business, so it is no surprise that organisations and educational facilities are exploring digital twin technologies to increase customer engagement.  Traditionally, it is next to impossible to understand customer movement patterns with a high degree of certainty or fidelity, but with advances in artificial intelligence, underpinned with digital twin visualisation techniques, the paradigm is shifting, and shifting quickly.

Gamifying User Experience

How a customer moves from Point A to Point B is important.  Let’s say, a customer, Janice, is researching the history of computer science, and needs to navigate to the reference section of the library from the front desk.  The time spent looking for the section she needs is directly proportional to her user experience. As such, you want to make her trip as easy and prompt as possible.  The better her experience, the better your score.  Realistically, Janice’s goal is arbitrary, and does not represent the goal of all customers, but each consumer indeed has a goal. 

A digital twin representation of your Library can help you visualise consumer movements in real time but should not stop there.  Fundamentally, the library should be designed in a way that it improves overall experience, and to achieve this, the digital twin provides context sensitive information on paths traversed by all consumers, as well as time spent in each section.

Setting the Score

By allowing Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) to define rules based on how customers are supposed to interact with areas, or assets within the Library, a digital twin can measure the effectiveness of specific areas and assets.  Resource footprints should then be rearranged, to improve user experience, based on the actionable insights recognised from the digital twin.

Bridging the Age Gap – Digital twin, an Aged Care Story

Retirement and Aged Care facilities are information rich ecosystems.  Physical and digital record keeping does not stop at pen, paper, or database; no doubt, these facilities do indeed have Big Data.  Internet of Things (IoT) devices measure and record many things: Temperature maintenance (both medical refrigeration and facility temperature), site and resident security (ins and outs) and medical administration, amongst many others.  The success of the facility depends heavily on proper record management and stringent policy adherence.

Human-proofing care

Humans are in no way perfect, and we make mistakes.  That is what makes us human, we accept it, and in some ways, we celebrate it; however, our mistakes can be problematic.  In a care setting, errors can literally be fatal.  Taking a digital twin approach to Aged Care, ensures that context sensitive information is delivered at the right time, to the right people.  Proper information delivery could mean the difference between an incident and one mitigated. 

Imagine, as an orderly completes their rounds, they navigate the facility on their tablet as they walk the halls.  The digital twin of the facility displays information pertaining to refrigerator and room temperatures, alleviating the requirement for manual investigation.  Interventions are also possible from within the application, improving service delivery and ensuring a safe environment for all, in a fraction of the regular time.

Front-foot tactics for Local Government Infrastructure with digital twin

Local Governments are the conduit of communities.  They provide services and infrastructure which improve our lives and societies as Australians.  In order to continue to develop in an efficient and cost-effective manner, digital twin implementations can provide tremendous value in assisting councils to understand their infrastructure, and the citizens they serve.  But why should councils use digital twins over traditional means?

Why digital twins?

Local Government budgets are not only tightly constrained, they also have a wide scope.  The ability to generate actionable insights on infrastructure and citizens is invaluable.  Imagine having the ability to visualise, in real time, the communities use of new infrastructure, or a map view identifying houses whose rate payments are due, or being able to explore arterial and local rounds, with context sensitive information around maintenance schedules?  This sounds great, but the real benefit comes from being able to do all of this, and more, in a matter of minutes.

One Stop Shop – Actionable Insights via the exposé Digital Twin

Councils, utilities, care providers, retailers, manufacturers, property management companies, construction companies, engineering firms, universities, etc. are adopting and embracing digital twins right now!  Click here to find out how organisations are exploring digital twin technology to manage infrastructure, digitally, and how Exposé can assist your business in bridging the digital gap.

Digital Twins – Why all the fuss?

What do Twins, NASA, Pokémon Go, the Internet of Things, Big Data and business value have in common?

As our landscape changes to embrace digital integration, the physical and virtual worlds are moving closer together than ever before.

As flagged by Gartner, digital twins are pegged to be a key strategic technology trend for 2020 , and well into the following years too.  Since their inception in 2017, digital twins have enormous potential to create significant opportunity and also cause major disruption.

So, what is a digital twin?

Simply put, a digital twin is a virtual representation, a “twin”, of any physical world object, space, asset, model, or system on which the operations of that physical twin is projected.

It is immensely useful to anyone who needs to understand their physical world by performing analysis, gaining insights and performing simulation and modelling on a platform that acts as a replica twin of the physical twin.

It is so much more than a redundant copy of the physical twin—to use an analogy, in 2016, the world was introduced to Pokémon Go, an Augmented Reality video gaming experience; far different to anything most had previously witnessed. What Pokémon Go meant to gaming, is pretty much what digital twin means for methods of analysis, insights and modelling. In both Pokémon Go and digital twin, immersive augmented and virtual reality literally blends the physical world with the digital world, with the latter helping us gain a new understanding of the former in a way never possible before. In the case of digital twins, this immersive experience allows the user to be immersed as if in the physical space to conduct required analysis, test hypothesis, monitor, correct, etc. – all remotely.

Variants of digital twins are:

  • Composite digital twin – where data from multiple digital twins are aggregated for a composite view across a number of physical world entities such as a power plant or a city; and
  • Predictive digital twin, where machine learning puts our insights and understanding of the physical world on steroids!

Think:

There are endless use cases for digital twins across most industries, including local-, state- and federal government, utilities, universities, retail, manufacturing, defence, healthcare, age care, construction, and so on. Our subsequent article Digital twin – Topical use cases will delve much further into some topical use cases, but here are a few:

  • A domain scientist who needs to understand the acoustics in the pipes of a water network so that pipe bursts can be predicted. This will provide huge cost savings and avoid reputational damage;
  • An urban planner who needs to maximise the amount of residential, business and recreational space with consideration of both pedestrians and vehicle access, movement and connectivity. This will help understand the integration of land use and transport needs; something all cities battle with;
  • Rostering analysts, for example, a residential care organisation that needs to understand the location of field staff and their tasks and skills in order to do more effective rostering and save time. Digital twin can assist in this way to save time and costs and ensure the right skills are at the right place, at the right time;
  • The environmental analyst who needs to monitor and decrease the organisation’s carbon footprint by monitoring CO2 emissions and power generated. This will help achieve carbon offset and ultimately reduce CO2 emissions;
  • An asset planner needs to analyse the performance of an asset, specially through the lens of past history such as servicing, faults, outputs, etc. as well as predicted performance, and a real time monitoring of said asset. This will help optimise all aspects of the asset and ultimately extend its life, reduce life-cycle costs and ensure availability. Assets in this sense are by no means just machinery in a manufacturing plant but ranges from a pool pump in a leisure centre, through to an advanced diagnostic machine in a hospital, or the crane on a construction site;
  • Head of security at a large stadium needs to understand crowd volume and sudden negative sentiment changes where larger groups congregate. This will help proactively deal with crowd security issues immediately, before they get out of hand by moving security personnel around where they are mostly required;
  • An engineer conducting building information modelling (BIM) needs to simulate construction, logistics, and fabrication sequences with the supply chain, and ensure the design takes people flow and emergency evacuations into account. This will help achieve an optimal and safe building will emerge from construction;
  • A university librarian needs to understand the movement of student through the large university library. This will help achieve a better use and mix of space.

Who benefits?

We all do. As is shown in the examples above, those benefiting from the superior insights gained from digital twin are not only those persons who own, manage and operate the physical twins, but us, the consumer (i.e, more targeted aged care), the citizen (a better and cleaner city) and the patient (for example more accurate diagnostics).

Why is it disruptive (‘Houston, we have a problem’)?

The concept of a twin created to understand another is certainly not new. NASA, in the 60s, used twinning ideas to create physically duplicated systems here on earth to match the systems in space, which allowed engineers on the ground to model and test possible solutions, simulating the conditions in space.

When Apollo 13’s lunar module ran into serious problems, such as rising carbon-dioxide that approached life-threatening levels, the engineers on the ground used the duplicates here on the ground to model and test theories and simulations so that they could instruct the astronauts, and eventually get the ill-fated crew of Apollo 13 back to earth alive.

The value in NASA’s replicas, or the many replicas since then, including motor vehicle design wind tunnels, mini wave and tidal pools, etc. and undeniable. But of course, the NASA, and subsequent replicas where physical, not digital.

With the advance of computing capacity and the Internet of Things (IOT), digital twins are now gaining traction across so many industries. The physical mirrors can now be replaced with digital ones and the pervasiveness and reduced cost of IOT means we can monitor what is happening with the physical twin in real time. Throw in machine learning, and all manner of additional insights and modelling are possible.  

So IOT and artificial intelligence (AI) is the miracle mirror, right? Not really. AI augments human capabilities, but it does not replace them. Like  Henk van Houten, Executive Vice President, Chief Technology Officer, Royal Philips, states, “…it was human ingenuity that helped to bring the crew of Apollo 13 home – not technology alone” (https://www.philips.com/a-w/about/news/archive/blogs/innovation-matters/20180830-the-rise-of-the-digital-twin-how-healthcare-can-benefit.html). This means that a digital twin is not meant to be an unsupervised fully intelligent expert system, but rather a platform where a human can analyse and model in order to gain the insight and understanding required. Even when predictive models through machine learning are included, domain subject matter experts must still form part of the analysis process due to their understanding of the physical twin.

In conclusion

Digital twins, as described here, enable users to analyse the physical world, with context sensitive information, without having to traverse the particular physical space (twin). The benefits of this are:

  • A location can be explored at a fraction of the time, compared to actual exploration;
  • Context sensitive information is available immediately, and in real time;
  • And the users react immediately to their experience.

In our subsequent article, Digital Twins – Topical use cases, we will delve much further into some topical use cases and we show why organisations should really consider how digital twins could benefit them.

Our unique product, the exposé Digital Twin is a quick to market, cost effective version of this disrupting technology and provides a truly 360 degree view of your physical world though our highly interactive visual experience, revolutionising the way you interact with your world.

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Using your historical data, putting it on steroids with the help of Machine Learning, then overlaying it with Augmented reality. All of a sudden you can see what impact changes in the physical space will have on your data. You can almost “experience” what the changes will look like.

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In this demo, we show a segment of the Adelaide city map. It shows how foot traffic is affected by factors such as weather, time of day, the day of the week, etc. It also peers into the future by tying the solution into Machine Learning to see the likely effect on foot traffic in the future, including through substantial infrastructure changes such as replacing a building with a park.

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